Can powerful poses improve self-confidence in children?

12 days ago
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Source: Science Daily

A dominant body posture can help children develop higher self-confidence. This study was established by psychologists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg and the Otto Friedrich University of Bamberg.

When a person sits with their arms crossed behind their head, resting their feet casually on a table, they are probably feeling very self-confident. Whereas arms folded and hunched back typically indicates insecurity. Research on so-called power posing investigates, among other things, the extent to which a certain body posture might influence a person's feelings and self-esteem. Research on so-called power posing investigates, among other things, the extent to which a certain body posture might influence a person's feelings and self-esteem.

Power posing is the nonverbal expression of power. It involves making very bold gestures and changes in body posture. Up to now, most of the research has revolved around studying the effects on adults. Körner and colleagues' study is the first to examine children. Children from the age of five are able to recognize and interpret the body posture of others

The experiment was conducted with 108 fourth graders. One group was to assume two open and expansive postures for one minute each. The other group posed with their arms folded in front of them and their heads down. The children then completed a series of psychological tests. The children who had previously assumed an open posture indicated better mood and reported higher self-esteem than the children in the other group.

The new study is consistent with earlier findings on power posing; however, the concept is controversial in the field of psychological research.